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Anis al-Doleh, The Princess With Moustache. 13 Men Committed Suicide Because She Rejected Them.

History

The beauty is a personal thing. And what’s the beauty nowadays when people go under knives to be (more) beautiful and (more) attractive? Is it familiar to you when someone says that you are as beautiful as a princess? But have you ever seen a princess with a moustache? All aboard, here comes the beauty with moustache. This isn’t a joke. Scroll down and you’ll see!

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Anis al- (sitting)

Anis l-Doleh was the most eligible princess in the 19th-century, and despite not having a head turning beauty, she managed to make hundreds of men begging her marry them thanks to her brilliant mind (she was filthy rich as well).

She was so desirable that some men even committed suicide after being rejected

This is, joking aside, a woman and a princess who was certainly not considered ugly. She might even have been considered a beauty.

Even though she was not charming at all, her family was wealthy and she was blonde. The property of her family was enormous, but besides, the princess was one of the few educated women of the time in Iraq.

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Anis al-Doleh or soulmate of State

She was so smart and capable that her family asked her advice on matters of governance and management from an early age.

She had a special ability in diplomacy, because her way of expression and her ability to resolve disputes in a peaceful manner prevented many conflicts.

Her wealth and intelligence were, therefore, the two most important features that made her so irresistible.

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The story even states that when Anis l-Doleh was at the age of marriage she had marriage proposals from at least 150 amorous suitors of high nobilityfrom the surrounding kingdoms, while 13 of them committed suicide because of her refusal to marry them.

Persian King

Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar

In the end, the chosen lover and husband was the Persian king Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar. He ruled over Iran for 47 years, and he ruled over his wives, 84 wives to be more precise.

Ad-Din Shah Qajar and the photographer Sevryugin before a photoshoot.

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Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar and his beloved wife Anis al-Doleh

Nasser al-Din Shah himself printed the photos in the palace laboratory and kept in satin albums in his Golestan Palace, which now is the museum.

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On the right, Anis al-Doleh, Naser’s wife

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Part of King Naser’s harem at the picnic.

Anis was his most important and a queen wife, so she had the lead over the rest.

The king Shah Naser al-Din Shah Qajar, was a powerful macho man in 1948, the fourth most powerful man at that time. His kingdom was the longest in the history of Iran.

Let’s talk a little bit of the female beauty in the Qajar period. I’ll give you few words: thickness in double meaning, thick in eyebrows and chubby. Oh, I mean in an eyebrow, in a unibrow. Hey, one love, one brow. Then, moustache. Thin and shaved, no thanks!

When a foreign merchant asked Nasser why the big sized women were considered beautiful, the king just replied: “When you go to the butchers, do you buy bones or meat?” I am sure you won’t disagree with that.

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Part of King Naser’s harem wearing ballet tutus

Maybe the most bizarre fact is that all his wives were wearing tutus. They were copies of Russians ballet dancers who fascinated the king. Speaking of the natural look, they left the legs unshaved. The reason for wearing tutu was the mark “not handsome enough.”

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Young concubine with a hookah.

If beauty is in the eye of the beholder then Shah was totally blind.

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Khanum Ismat al-Dawlah daughter of Nasir al-Din Shah. Part of the collection of the Institute for Iranian Contemporary Historical Studies (ع 3-5216).

via: cloudmind

© Image Source: xubux

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1 Comment

  • tam August 29, 2018

     “When you go to the butchers, do you buy bones or meat?” I love this logic!

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